Collective responses of a large mackerel school depend on the size and speed of a robotic fish but not on tail motion

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dc.contributor.author Kruusmaa, Maarja
dc.contributor.author Rieucau, Guillaume
dc.contributor.author Castillo Montoya, José Carlos
dc.contributor.author Markna, Riho
dc.contributor.author Handegard, Nils Olav
dc.date.accessioned 2021-12-14T10:05:50Z
dc.date.available 2021-12-14T10:05:50Z
dc.date.issued 2016-10
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitation Kruusmaa, M., Rieucau, G., Montoya, J. C. C., Markna, R. & Handegard, N. O. (2016). Collective responses of a large mackerel school depend on the size and speed of a robotic fish but not on tail motion. Bioinspiration & Biomimetics, 11(5), 056020.
dc.identifier.issn 1748-3182
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10016/33756
dc.description.abstract So far, actuated fish models have been used to study animal interactions in small-scale controlled experiments. This study, conducted in a semi-controlled setting, investigates robot5interactions with a large wild-caught marine fish school (∼3000 individuals) in their natural social environment. Two towed fish robots were used to decouple size, tail motion and speed in a series of sea-cage experiments. Using high-resolution imaging sonar and sonar-video blind scoring, we monitored and classified the school's collective reaction towards the fish robots as attraction or avoidance. We found that two key releasers—the size and the speed of the robotic fish—were responsible for triggering either evasive reactions or following responses. At the same time, we found fish reactions to the tail motion to be insignificant. The fish evaded a fast-moving robot even if it was small. However, mackerels following propensity was greater towards a slow small robot. When moving slowly, the larger robot triggered significantly more avoidance responses than a small robot. Our results suggest that the collective responses of a large school exposed to a robotic fish could be manipulated by tuning two principal releasers—size and speed. These results can help to design experimental methods for in situ observations of wild fish schools or to develop underwater robots for guiding and interacting with free-ranging aggregated aquatic organisms.
dc.description.sponsorship This work was financed by the Norwegian Research Council (grant 204229/F20) and Estonian Government Target Financing (grant SF0140018s12). JCC was partially supported by a grant from Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway through the EEA Financial Mechanism, operated by Universidad Complutense de Madrid. We are grateful to A. Totland for his technical help. The animal collection was approved by The Royal Norwegian Ministry of Fisheries, and the experiment was approved by the Norwegian Animal Research Authority. The Institute of Marine Research is permitted to conduct experiments at the Austevoll aquaculture facility by the Norwegian Biological Resource Committee and the Norwegian Animal Research Committee (Forsøksdyrutvalget).
dc.format.extent 12
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher IOP Publishing
dc.rights © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.
dc.rights Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
dc.subject.other Biorobotics
dc.subject.other Collective behaviour
dc.subject.other Animal-robot interaction
dc.subject.other Atlantic mackerel
dc.subject.other Underwater robot
dc.subject.other Fish robot
dc.subject.other Information-transfer
dc.subject.other Killer whales
dc.subject.other Aspect ratio
dc.subject.other Behavior
dc.subject.other Escape
dc.subject.other Performance
dc.subject.other Frequency
dc.subject.other Atlantic
dc.subject.other Shoals
dc.subject.other Score
dc.title Collective responses of a large mackerel school depend on the size and speed of a robotic fish but not on tail motion
dc.type article
dc.subject.eciencia Informática
dc.subject.eciencia Robótica e Informática Industrial
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-3190/11/5/056020
dc.rights.accessRights openAccess
dc.type.version acceptedVersion
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage 056020
dc.identifier.publicationissue 5
dc.identifier.publicationtitle Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
dc.identifier.publicationvolume 11
dc.identifier.uxxi AR/0000018371
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