How is communication of vaccines in traditional media: a systematic review

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dc.contributor.author Catalán Matamoros, Daniel Jesús
dc.contributor.author Peñafiel Saiz, Carmen
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-18T11:09:53Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-18T11:09:53Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitation Perspect Public Health. V.139, n. 1 (2019), pp. 34-43
dc.identifier.issn 1757-9139
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10016/32179
dc.description.abstract Aim: Taking into account that a key determinant in public approval of vaccinations is how the media constructs and frames messages about vaccination programmes, our aim is to review communication studies exploring media coverage of vaccines within traditional media venues. Methods: Using a registered protocol (PROSPERO: 42017072849), a systematic review was conducted that searched in three international electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and the International Bibliography of Social Science) for articles published between 2007 and 2017 following content-analysis methods. The characteristics and outcomes were systematically identified and described. The search yielded 24 eligible studies that were further analysed in the review. Results: Media coverage of vaccines has been largely studied during the last decade. Findings revealed that 62% (n = 15) of studies analysed the human papillomavirus vaccine, 87% (n = 21) examined newspapers, and 62% (n = 15) examined North American media. In relation to media content analyses, 75% found negative messages on vaccines and 83% identified a lack of accurate information. Conclusions: This systematic review suggests an agenda for further research. There is a significant need to analyse other types of traditional media beyond newspapers. Future studies should focus on other geographical areas such as low-income countries and on analysing visual materials and digital media. We found that negative messages and inaccurate information are common in media coverage on vaccines; therefore, further research focusing on these topics is needed. Officials in public health organizations should develop a close collaboration with the media to improve public communication on vaccines.
dc.format.extent 10
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Royal Society for Public Health
dc.rights © Royal Society for Public Health 2018
dc.rights Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
dc.subject.other Vaccination
dc.subject.other Mass Media
dc.subject.other Newspapers
dc.subject.other Public Health
dc.subject.other Journalism
dc.subject.other Print news coverage
dc.subject.other HPV vaccine
dc.subject.other Newspaper coverage
dc.subject.other Cervical-cancer
dc.subject.other Immunization
dc.subject.other Health
dc.subject.other Risk
dc.subject.other Information
dc.subject.other Resistance
dc.subject.other Boys
dc.title How is communication of vaccines in traditional media: a systematic review
dc.type article
dc.relation.publisherversion https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1757913918780142
dc.subject.eciencia Ciencias de la Información
dc.identifier.doi 10.1177/1757913918780142
dc.rights.accessRights openAccess
dc.type.version acceptedVersion
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage 34
dc.identifier.publicationissue 1
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage 43
dc.identifier.publicationtitle Perspectives in Public Health
dc.identifier.publicationvolume 139
dc.identifier.uxxi AR/0000023023
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