Towards high performance small animal positron emission tomography

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dc.contributor.author Green, Michael V.
dc.contributor.author Seidel, Jürgen
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Calvin A.
dc.contributor.author Vaquero López, Juan José
dc.contributor.author Desco Menéndez, Manuel
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-26T12:36:17Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-26T12:36:17Z
dc.date.issued 2002-07
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitation 2002 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging Proceedings, Jul. 2002, p. 369-372
dc.identifier.isbn 0-7803-7584-X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10016/12185
dc.description Proceeding of: 2002 IEEE Symposium International on Biomedical Imaging, Washington, D.C., USA, July 7-10, 2002
dc.description.abstract During the last decade increasingly sophisticated positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have been developed for imaging small laboratory animals. These systems often exhibit performance characteristics, e.g. spatial resolution, substantially better than contemporary human PET scanners and are often the first systems to demonstrate new technologies, e. g. avalanche photodiodebased detector modules. Despite these advances, spatial resolution, sensitivity, resolution uniformity and other performance parameters must continue to be improved if accurate general purpose imaging is to be carried out in the most popular research subject, the mouse. Moreover. as these improvements occur, methods must also be devised to minimize the resolution-degrading effects of positron range, the distance a positron travels from the decaying nucleus before encountering and mutually anll1hllattng an electron. Range effects are particularly important for compounds labeled with "non-traditional" positron-emitters such as 1-124 or Tc-94m. In order to illustrate the complex interplay of issues that must be addressed when contemplating such improvements, we describe how we have approached high performance PET imaging in the design and construction of ATLAS (Advanced Technology Laboratory Animal Scanner), a small animal PET scanner now entering servIce at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher IEEE
dc.rights © IEEE
dc.title Towards high performance small animal positron emission tomography
dc.type bookPart
dc.type conferenceObject
dc.relation.publisherversion http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2002.1029270
dc.subject.eciencia Biología y Biomedicina
dc.identifier.doi 10.1109/ISBI.2002.1029270
dc.rights.accessRights openAccess
dc.relation.eventdate July 7-10, 2002
dc.relation.eventplace Washington, D.C., USA
dc.relation.eventtitle 2002 IEEE Symposium International on Biomedical Imaging
dc.relation.eventtype proceeding
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage 369
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage 372
dc.identifier.publicationtitle 2002 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging Proceedings
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